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Wednesday, November 23, 2022 – The Atheist Kenya society has declared its full support for the use and importation of the controversial Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) maize.

In a statement, Atheist President Harrison Mumia said they were in full support of the move by President William Ruto’s government to allow GMO maize in Kenya

Mumia explained that importing GMOs into the country will be a solution to food insecurity as millions face acute starvation occasioned by drought.

According to Mumia, there has never been justifiable harm associated with GMO crops.

The organization argued that several countries around the world, including advanced ones, had immensely benefited from GMO foods.

“GM crops have been shown to have more impact in countries like India and Brazil,” noted the statement.

According to the society, Kenya has been struggling with farm inputs like fertilizers, and GMOs would offer a long-lasting solution for farmers.

“In a country such as ours, where farm inputs, like fertilizers, farm equipment, and pesticides are becoming harder to afford for our farmers, we believe that GM crops have more to offer,” read part of the statement.

Emphasizing the benefits, Mumia argued that GMOs are harmless and that the fears associated with the technology were imaginary.

“GMOs are not poison. The perceived ills of genetically modified foods are illusory and far smaller than believed,” concluded the Atheists boss.

This statement came hours after the Catholic Archbishop of Nyeri Anthony Muheria faulted Trade Cabinet Secretary Moses Kuria for suggesting that GMOs are one of the many threats that can kill Kenyans.

Raila Odinga is also opposed to GMOs even after supporting them in 2011.

The Kenyan DAILY POST.

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