Tuesday May 19, 2020 – Kisumu Governor Peter Anyang’ Nyong’o has issued an urgent call to East African Community (EAC) Chairpersonk, President Paul Kagame, to help resolve the floods crisis in the County that has since left thousands of Kenyans displaced.

In a statement on Tuesday, Nyong’o faulted neighbouring Uganda for the record rise in water levels at Lake Victoria that has since wreaked havoc in the region.

He called for a restructuring of the management of Owen Falls Dam in Uganda which controls the outflow of Lake Victoria.

He raised concerns that the Lake basin may continue to receive above-normal rainfall.

Nyong’o attributed the challenges faced in the region to lack of proper controls of water flows at Owen Falls Dam in Uganda.

This he says had caused the Lake’s waters to rise to record levels, submerging landing sites and homes.

“Under the chairmanship of Rwandan President Paul Kagame, I call on Heads of the six-member states to sit down and ensure the natural flow of Lake Victoria is not interfered with.”

“It is alarming that the water level is rapidly increasing and having impacts on various activities and communities around the lake,” Nyong’o appealed.

This came after 14 Governors under the Lake Region Economic Bloc (LREB) embarked on an initiative to construct dams along rivers Nzoia, Yala and Nyando alongside dykes as part of a lasting solution to the perennial flooding problems in the region.

The regional leaders agreed that the dams will reduce the amount of water that flows into Lake Victoria.

The water levels in Lake Victoria have hit 13.42 metres, a record high.

Uganda Water Minister, Sam Cheptoris, said that the backflow and rise in water levels at the lake were as a result of the emergence of several floating islands that had blocked River Nile, the only outflow of Lake Victoria.

In a statement on Wednesday, May 13, 2020, Cheptoris assured the country that the Government will move to stop the islands or remove them once located by surveillance.

The Kenyan DAILY POST


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